Case Compass Guide

Learn about what enables CMIS development

Learn about what enables CMIS development
What are the key factors that enable introducing a CMIS in a country?
It may be less than you think. When resources match ambitions, countries can adopt case management practices, and develop appropriate CMISes. Based on a review of country experiences, this section suggests a set of key factors that would facilitate the introduction of a CMIS and provides some examples on how a variety of countries turned these enabling conditions into CMIS platforms. Many of these factors relate to the introduction of case management interventions, generally in place before the development of a CMIS. The Case Compass team is ready to support Governments in defining and developing what it takes to strengthen an integrated provision of services through case management.
Enabling factors
Social & employment services
Social & employment services
Because case management works by directing beneficiaries to benefits and services, it is important that there are enough social and employment services to inform or refer beneficiaries to.
Previous experience in case management
Previous experience in case management
It helps if a country has case management experience developed through at least in one pilot program (or more established professional social services) or adequate resources in place to train social workers case management.

Learn more in the Chile case study
Institutional & strategic support
Institutional & strategic support
It helps if case management services will be part of an institutionally well-established entity. Ideally, they will also be part of a broader strategy

Learn more in the Italy case study
Sources of financing
Sources of financing
Case management and CMISes cost money to implement and maintain. It helps to work with a government willing to finance the development of the CMIS, and one which can bring in the required expertise (the World Bank may help with terms of reference and other necessities).

Learn more in the Romania case study
An enabling legislative framework
An enabling legislative framework
Before the World Bank begins working in a country on CMISes, the required legislation related to information exchange and data privacy should be in place. If it is not, there should be (few) gaps that need to be filled. If gaps are too many to fill, starting work may be more difficult.
Key pieces of hardware & Minimum IT infrastructure
Key pieces of hardware & Minimum IT infrastructure
There is a minimum IT infrastructure needed to start working with good probability of success. It is helpful to have computers or tablets provided by the government or donors. Is it sustainable for the WB to support a project in which people work on personal devices? (privacy issues, long term sustainability, internet costs etc.).